View Poll Results: Do you need to have a clear English identity before an effective English Parliament?

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  • No, set up an English Parliament first then sort out English identity later

    2 40.00%
  • Yes, sort out our English identity first then set up an English Parliament

    1 20.00%
  • I do not know if I am really accepted as an English person

    0 0%
  • Who are the English?

    2 40.00%
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Thread: Do you need to have a clear English identity before an effective English Parliament?

  1. #21
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    That should be MRH "My Royal Highness", or 'sRH "(Ron)'s RH", or if young Ron agrees, then s'RH "(Ron)s' RH".
    There's a lot of English going around, you see them a lot but few Saxons. Could be some vacancies there. So blacks should be Black Saxons, it's got rhythm when played on white notes.
    Last edited by chimera; 22-01-2012 at 03:40 AM.

  2. #22
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    Exclamation English Power in the Scottish Parliament and the Welsh Assembly

    Quote Originally Posted by Mr Rob View Post
    Why don't you outline the decision making processes in the Scottish Parliament and the Welsh Assembly, and then give us a description of how you think ethnicity impacted upon them - as it was you who asked the question?

    Think carefully.

    Answer intelligently.


    English Power in the Scottish Parliament and the Welsh Assembly


    Is it not true that the decision making processes in the Scottish Parliament and the Welsh Assembly could not exist and/or function without the approval of the English Authorities (or those that control English Power)?





    STATEMENT

    The decision making processes in the Scottish Parliament and the Welsh Assembly are impacted by and subject to the Power of English cultural values.





    What say ye? (What say you all?)






    Who is worthy of The Throne of England if it is not I?



    Last edited by race_inspector; 22-01-2012 at 12:17 PM. Reason: Clarity, Majesty and Power

  3. #23
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    Q.1 yes
    Q.2 yes
    There are English in the English and they influence Wales and Scotland. And they have a flag.
    The man asked you a question after answering yours. Could your majesty power race religion dictate an answer? Please. Your highness.

  4. #24
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    Thumbs up The English Governance of Scotland and Wales

    Quote Originally Posted by chimera View Post
    There are English in the English and they influence Wales and Scotland. And they have a flag.
    The man asked you a question after answering yours.



    Scottish Parliament
    Elections for the Scottish Parliament were amongst the first in Britain to use a mixed member proportional representation (MMS) system.[62] The system is a form of the additional member method of proportional representation (PR), and is better known as such in Britain. Under the system, voters are given two votes: one for a specific candidate and one for a political party.

    Scottish Parliament - Wikipedia, the free encyclopedia




    National Assembly for Wales


    Under mixed member proportional representation, a type of additional member system,[26][27] forty of the AMs are elected from single-member constituencies on a plurality voting system (or first past the post) basis, the constituencies being equivalent to those used for the House of Commons and twenty AMs are elected from regional closed lists using an alternative party vote.[28] There are five regions: Mid and West Wales, North Wales, South Wales Central, South Wales East and South Wales West (these are the same as the pre 1999 European Parliament constituencies for Wales), each of which returns four members.[28] The additional members produce a degree of proportionality within each region.[28] Whereas voters can choose any regional party list irrespective of their party vote in the constituency election, list AMs are not elected independently of the constituency element; rather, elected constituency AMs are deemed to be pre-elected list representatives for the purposes of calculating remainders in the d'Hondt method.[28] Overall proportionality is limited by the low proportion of list members (33% of the Assembly compared with 43% in the Scottish Parliament and 50% in the German Bundestag) and the regionalisation of the list element.[29] Consequently, the Assembly as a whole has a greater degree of proportionality (based on proportions in the list elections) than the plurality voting system used for UK parliamentary elections, but still deviates somewhat from proportionality.[29]


    National Assembly for Wales - Wikipedia, the free encyclopedia


    Are you all satisfied?

    What more do you want?


















    ENGLAND AND THE BRITDEMS




    De facto (English pronunciation: /d ˈfkt/, /d/[1]) is a Latin expression that means "concerning fact." In law, it often means "in practice but not necessarily ordained by law" or "in practice or actuality, but not officially established." It is commonly used in contrast to de jure (which means "concerning the law") when referring to matters of law, governance, or technique (such as standards) that are found in the common experience as created or developed without or contrary to a regulation. When discussing a legal situation, de jure designates what the law says, while de facto designates action of what happens in practice. It is analogous and similar to the expressions "for all intents and purposes" or "in fact."

    De facto - Wikipedia, the free encyclopedia De jure - Wikipedia, the free encyclopedia
    Last edited by race_inspector; 22-01-2012 at 01:36 PM. Reason: POWER!

  5. #25
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    Where is race mentioned there? The last sentence on Wale's' ' A'ssembl'y says it's different from UK parliament so it's' less' English than the English. May I have a new poster from his race please? This one seems to be broken.
    Last edited by chimera; 22-01-2012 at 01:58 PM.

  6. #26
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    Lightbulb All Welsh people are White (That is Official)

    Quote Originally Posted by chimera View Post
    Where is race mentioned there? . . . .

    All Welsh people are White.

    Welsh Race is not mentioned there but is codified here:

    Source: http://www.education.gov.uk/escs-isb/standardslibrary/a0077051/ethnicity-data-standard







    Welsh Subordination to the Power of England


    Quote Originally Posted by chimera View Post
    . . . . . . . The last sentence on Wale's' ' A'ssembl'y says it's different from UK parliament so it's' less' English than the English. . . . . .

    Or course the Welsh Assembly is bound to be "less English than the English" because Wales is not England.

    Having to speak English does not make one English.

    Does that all make sense?





    ENGLAND AND THE BRITDEMS






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    Last edited by race_inspector; 23-01-2012 at 11:04 AM. Reason: Clarity, Majesty and Power

  7. #27
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    You are all welcome to come up to the BritDem White Power surgery this afternoon.

    http://www.democracyforum.co.uk/soci...y-2pm-4pm.html

  8. #28
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    "Does that all make sense?"
    No.
    "Welsh Race is not mentioned there but is codified here:"
    You agree race is not mentioned as part of the Welsh Assembly. The Education ethnicity data has nothing to do with the Assembly. Your quoted definition of the Welsh Assembly and my comment which you copied, says the constitution is different from the English Westminster. But in both constitutions, there is no racial recognition. There is a majority of English / Welsh people and you know there is support for ethnic minorities. What are you raving on about, do you know?
    Last edited by chimera; 23-01-2012 at 11:41 AM.

  9. #29
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    Question English power and the welsh census

    Quote Originally Posted by chimera View Post
    "Does that all make sense?"
    No.
    "Welsh Race is not mentioned there but is codified here:"
    You agree race is not mentioned as part of the Welsh Assembly. The Education ethnicity data has nothing to do with the Assembly.


    ENGLISH POWER AND THE WELSH CENSUS

    http://www.ons.gov.uk/ons/guide-meth...les/index.html


    Is there a difference between Education Ethnicity Data and Census Ethnicity Data?

    Think carefully.

    Answer intelligently.

    What sayest thou? (What say you?)














    Quote Originally Posted by chimera View Post
    . . . . . . Your quoted definition of the Welsh Assembly and my comment which you copied, says the constitution is different from the English Westminster. But in both constitutions, there is no racial recognition.


    NO RACIAL RECOGNITION?

    How does Racial recognition in the Census impact the Governance of England and Wales?

    Think carefully.

    Answer intelligently.

    What sayest thou? (What say you?)







    De facto (English pronunciation: /d ˈfkt/, /d/[1]) is a Latin expression that means "concerning fact." In law, it often means "in practice but not necessarily ordained by law" or "in practice or actuality, but not officially established." It is commonly used in contrast to de jure (which means "concerning the law") when referring to matters of law, governance, or technique (such as standards) that are found in the common experience as created or developed without or contrary to a regulation. When discussing a legal situation, de jure designates what the law says, while de facto designates action of what happens in practice. It is analogous and similar to the expressions "for all intents and purposes" or "in fact."

    De facto - Wikipedia, the free encyclopedia De jure - Wikipedia, the free encyclopedia



    ENGLAND AND THE BRITDEMS
    Last edited by race_inspector; 23-01-2012 at 01:02 PM. Reason: Clarity, Majesty and Power

  10. #30
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    "Is there a difference between Education Ethnicity Data and Census Ethnicity Data?"
    They are both English language but are spelled differently. They have no affect on voting rights.

    "How does Racial recognition in the Census impact the Governance of England and Wales?"
    Look I just answered that, can't you read? No-affect-on-voting-rights.

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